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Fatigue in construction

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Construction work involves high-risk activities. To work safely, construction workers must
be physically and mentally alert. This means that fatigue is a potential risk. Employers and employees have a responsibility to manage fatigue in the workplace.

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Silica dust in construction

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Construction work can produce silica dust. Exposure to silica dust is dangerous and can cause serious lung disease. Remove silica dust from a worksite, or control any exposure to ensure worker safety.

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Noise levels created by common construction tools

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Workers in industries, such as construction, use a variety of tools and machinery in the course of their work. One of the hazardous aspects of using this equipment, or being around people who use it, is noise.

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Be safe working on roofs

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Everyone is responsible for preventing falls when working on a roof – the principal, the self-employed contractor and subcontractor, the employer and the worker.

Health and safety in the workplace starts when the decision is made to go ahead with a construction job. All aspects of working safely at height should be considered.

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Edge protection

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Edge protection helps prevent people, tools, and materials from falling:
> around the perimeters of a work area
> around openings
> where brittle material cannot safely support the weight of a person.

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Planning a safe approach to working at height

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This fact sheet will help you manage working at height safely. It is one of six fact sheets in the Working Safely at Height Toolkit to be used together with the Best Practice Guidelines for Working at Height in New Zealand .

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Selecting the right equipment for working safely at height

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This fact sheet will help you select the right equipment for working safely at height. It is one of six fact sheets in the Working Safely at Height Toolkit to be used together with the Best Practice Guidelines for Working at Height in New Zealand.

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Short duration work at height

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This fact sheet will help you plan safely for short duration work at height. It is one of six fact sheets in the Working Safely at Height Toolkit to be used together with the Best Practice Guidelines for Working at Height in New Zealand.

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Working at heights: roof restoration and maintenance

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People restoring or maintaining roofs work at heights for both short and long periods of time. When anyone works at height, they could be seriously injured or killed unless they use the right height hazard controls.

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Temporary work platforms

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This fact sheet will help you select and use temporary work platforms for working at height safely. This is one of six fact sheets in the Working Safely at Height Toolkit to be used together with the Best Practice Guidelines for Working at Height in New Zealand.

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Total restraint system

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This fact sheet will help you to select and use a total restraint system (sometimes referred to as a travel restraint system) for working safely at height. This fact sheet is one of six fact sheets in the Working Safely at Height Toolkit to be used together with the Best Practice Guidelines for Working at Height in New Zealand.

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Non-friable asbestos

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Non-friable asbestos may be removed by a competent contractor, i.e. someone who has the experience and knowledge of working with asbestos without risk to their own or others’ lives even if they do not have a certificate of competence for restricted work with asbestos.

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Locations where asbestos may be found

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If you are doing residential work and you are unsure whether asbestos may be present or not, proceed as if it is present.

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Surveying a building to determine whether asbestos is present

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The only way to positively confirm the presence of asbestos in a building material is to have the material tested using a method specified by an IANZ-accredited laboratory for asbestos testing.

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Managing asbestos

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Where there is a significant hazard to employees, an asbestos hazard must be managed in a hierarchy of elimination, isolation or minimisation.

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Health risks from asbestos exposure

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The health risks from asbestos occur when people breathe in airborne asbestos fibres. Once inhaled, they can become embedded in the lungs and may cause diseases such as asbestosis, lung cancer and mesothelioma.

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Restricted and notifiable work involving asbestos

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WorkSafe NZ must be notified of restricted work involving asbestos at least 24 hours before the work begins.

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Personal protective equipment to use when working with asbestos

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Personal protective clothing and equipment is an essential line of defence for minimising an asbestos hazard when elimination and isolation are not practicable.

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Disposal of asbestos waste

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Asbestos waste must be disposed of at approved local authority refuse sites. It must not be sold or re-used.

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Roof inspection and measurement

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Inspection of a roof is often necessary where a problem has been identified, there is a leak, or before refurbishment.

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Roofers using chainsaws

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During assessments for the Preventing Falls from Height project, inspectors have identified that some roofers are using chainsaws to cut roofing battens in situ and are not wearing the necessary personal protective equipment (PPE). Roofers must wear personal protective equipment if using chainsaws to cut roofing battens.

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Safe working with ladders and stepladders

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This fact sheet is for anyone considering using a ladder or step ladder in a workplace.

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Scaffolds with screening or containment sheeting

(PDF 290 KB)

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Scaffold sheeting or screening is used for both safety and environmental purposes. Where work is carried out close to pedestrian or vehicle access, scaffolds that are fully screened can minimise the risk to the public from falling objects. For this reason, toe boards must be fitted to screened scaffolds.

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Construction sector by the numbers

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See the latest view on risks within the sector and ACC statistics on serious injuries and fatalities.

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The Absolutely Essential Health and Safety toolkit

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The Absolutely Essential Health and Safety toolkit - for small construction sites

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Electricity Supply Arrangements on a Small Construction Site

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This fact sheet is for a person conducting a business or undertaking (PCBU) who manages or controls a small construction site. The fact sheet is one of four in the Electrical Safety on Small Construction Sites series. The related fact sheets and Electrical Safety Checklist have more information.

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Set-up and Electrical Safety On Site

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This fact sheet is for a person conducting a business or undertaking (PCBU) who manages or controls a small construction site. The fact sheet is one of four in the Electrical Safety on Small Construction Sites series. The related fact sheets and Electrical Safety Checklist have more information.

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RCDs, PSOAs, Leads, Cords, Plugs and Battery-Operated Equipment

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This fact sheet is for a person conducting a business or undertaking (PCBU) who manages or controls a small construction site. The fact sheet is one of four in the Electrical Safety on Small Construction Sites series. The related fact sheets and Electrical Safety Checklist have more information.

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Checking Your Electrical Equipment is Safe

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This fact sheet is for a person conducting a business or undertaking (PCBU) who manages or controls a small construction site. The fact sheet is one of four in the Electrical Safety on Small Construction Sites series. The related fact sheets and Electrical Safety Checklist have more information.

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Electrical Safety Checklist for Small Construction Sites

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This checklist is a guide for a person who manages or controls a small construction site. It shows what you should consider when setting up and using electricity. It outlines what WorkSafe expects you to check every day, what should be checked when the site is first set up, and what should be checked regularly (and as needed).

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